Combining quantum physics and agriculture

Hugh Lovel

Combining quantum physics and agriculture

Author:
Matt Ward

Combining quantum physics and agriculture

BY MATT WARD

17/11/2005 9:00:08 PM

“PLANTS need tiny amounts of an incredible array of nutrients in a delicate balance every day,” says US-born organic and biodynamic pioneer, Hugh Lovel, who is now working with Stephen Martin and crew at Quantum Ag Solutions in Tolga on North Queensland's Atherton Tableland.

Modern agriculture has relied on blasting plants with tremendous overdoses on an occasional basis. “We can do better than that.”

Previously an honours biochemistry student at Southeastern Louisiana University, Mr Lovel farmed biodynamically for 30 years in the southern US in Georgia raising beef, pork, chicken and a diverse market garden. Parallel to his studies and farming he worked as a printer, mechanic, carpenter, welder and oilfield cook. Believing it would change the social equation to supply pregnant mothers with food of the highest quality, he founded Union Agricultural Institute near Blairsville, Georgia—as well as chairing the Georgia Organic Growers’ certification committee in 1984 and ’85.

The land he started with was, in his own words, “a wrecked farm”. Using biodynamic principles, he reclaimed it to the point that the farm was averaging $4000 US per acre annually.

When he visited Cairns, Queensland as a speaker at the Inaugural Queensland Organic Conference in 2003 he met Stephen Martin, who had founded Quantum Ag Solutions, which supplied farmers on the Atherton Tablelands with high tech products and advice. He thought, “This company is promoting and putting into practice many of the farming principles I stand for. What was especially intriguing was Stephen called his company Quantum Ag Solutions.” After getting to know Stephen better it seemed predestined that Mr Lovel would move to Queensland to work with him.

As someone who grasps the practical side of life as well as the theoretical, Mr Lovel combines his study of quantum physics, biochemistry and the mind/body link with farming to envision an inspiring future for agriculture. As an application of quantum physics to agriculture, Mr Lovel pioneered the use of a device he calls a Quantum Field Broadcaster.

This is a stationary, self-driven device that induces self-reinforcing, resonant fractal patterns, like homeopathic potencies, directly into the life energy fields of soil and atmosphere. It not only improves the patterns of lime in the soil related to mineral release, nitrogen fixation, digestion and providing nutrients to plants, it also works with the atmospheric patterns of silica related to photosynthesis, blossoming, fruiting and ripening. Mr. Lovel believes healthy lime and silica patterns have the potential to change rainfall patterns and restore health to barren land. “Given the right political and economic conditions, an army of savvy engineers could reclaim the Sahara,” he says.

Bringing this quality of vision to Quantum Agriculture, Mr Lovel foresees a future where farmers concentrate on diversity, cooperation, integrity and flexibility rather than mass production and competition.